Hackers can remotely bug almost any machine…

SOURCE: https://dailym.ai/2apP5Ps

Our computer, phone and even printer could be spying on you.

Experts have warned everyday machines such as these may be used to bug any kind of building remotely.

A new king of malware uses circuits found on most devices and radio frequency waves to turn them into listening devices, without the hackers even accessing the machines.

A new king of malware uses circuits found on most devices and radio frequency waves to turn them into listening devices, without the hackers even accessing the machines. The malware, named ‘Funtenna’ by lead researcher Ang Cui from Red Balloon Security, would be hard to detect

HOW DOES FUNTENNA WORK?

Funtenna exploits radio frequencies, or RF signals, to turn office equipment into bugging devices.

It uses all the common pieces of hardware that can be found in basically every embedded device.

By uploading the malware to a device, the hackers can vibrate the prongs on general-purpose input/output circuits, on most embedded devices, at a frequency of their choice.

These vibrations can be picked up by a radio antenna.

In an example, the software was delivered to the phone through a printer.

The researchers sent a document, in the form of a CV, to the printer, which was connected to the same network as the phone, which installed the malware.

The phone then began transmitting the conversation it could hear using radio waves to a nearby computer.

Because the devices themselves are acting as transmitters, the technique bypasses all conventional network security.

The malware, named ‘Funtenna’ by lead researcher Ang Cui from Red Balloon Security, would be hard to detect because no traffic logs would catch data leaving the premises.

New York-based Red Balloon Security is a group of ‘white hat ‘hackers – computer security experts who break security so that a weakness can be found, fixed and improved, to make sure a company’s information is secure.

The company designs security systems to defend against these kind of attacks.

Funtenna exploits radio frequencies, or RF signals, to turn office equipment into bugging devices.

It uses ‘all the common pieces of hardware that you find in basically every embedded device,’ Mr Cui told Motherboard in a YouTube video.

It forces the hardware to transmit a signal that sends data to the hacker.

By uploading the malware to a device, the hackers can vibrate the prongs on general-purpose input/output circuits, that are found on most embedded devices, at a frequency of their choice

These vibrations can be picked up by a radio antenna.

Because the devices themselves are acting as transmitters, the technique bypasses all conventional network security.

Author: Amanda Walker

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